6 Scaffolding Hazards To Consider

Posted on November 27, 2019 in Uncategorised

team of workers prevents scaffolding hazardsWell-built scaffolding systems allow your employees to work at height, which is vital for many types of projects and operations. However, they do come with their inherent risks, such as the risk of slipping and falling, being injured by a falling object, or suffering a scaffolding collapse. As such, it’s important to be aware of these hazards and take steps to mitigate them.

The following are some of the most common scaffolding hazards to be aware of.

1. Debris, Tools, and Materials

Your employees will typically need to move tools and materials around while working at height, and a scaffolding system can facilitate that. However, items left lying around can pose a major hazard to anyone working in the area.

Why tools and debris are a hazard at height

Tools left lying around can pose a trip and fall hazard, leading to serious injuries—especially if they cause someone to fall off the scaffolding. In addition, these items themselves can pose a hazard if they fall and strike anyone working below.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

Make sure you have clear clean-up and inspection policies in place. No tools or building materials should be left unattended on the scaffold, and everything should be put away at the end of the workday. Routine cleanup of the scaffold is another must to prevent hazards from loose debris, pooled fluids, and other hazards.

2. Lack of Fall Prevention

Proper safety equipment, including PPE (personal protective equipment), fall arrest systems, and even guard rails are a must when working at height. Without these items, injuries from falls are much more likely.

Why lack of fall prevention is a hazard

Regardless of how clean you keep your scaffold work areas, there’s always a risk that someone is going to fall at some point. 

In fact, falls led to 887 workplace fatalities in 2017. Proper fall protection could have prevented a large number of those accidents.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

OSHA guidelines set forth strict requirements for scaffolding safety. 

Although 10 feet is OSHA requirement, Scaffolding Solutions follows industry best practices and provides guard rails after a height of 6 feet or more..

3. Poor Scaffolding Assembly

To further minimize the risk of injury, scaffolds themselves should be properly constructed. Loose or unstable planks, haphazard scaffold construction, and improper materials can all lead to devastating accidents.

Why poor scaffolding assembly is a hazard

Loose or weak planks can shift or break, causing a fall. If a scaffold’s structure isn’t sound, it could collapse, dumping tons of materials, equipment, and personnel to the ground and injuring anyone working in the area.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

Take your time building scaffolds, and make sure you use the right materials. Don’t mix and match components from different manufacturers or systems—doing so can lead to an unstable structure. After it’s all put together, inspect it to make sure all planks, beams, fasteners, and so forth are properly put together.

4. Scaffolding Damage

Over time, parts of a scaffold may become damaged, compromising the integrity of the entire structure. Planks may crack or deteriorate over time, parts may rust, and damage may result from the use of nearby equipment.

Why scaffolding damage is a hazard

Damage to a scaffold may render it structurally unsound, leading to a collapse. If you’re using wooden planks, those could deteriorate over time, causing them to shift, crack, or break, resulting in a fall injury.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

Routine inspections are an absolute must when working with scaffolding systems. These inspections should be conducted daily. Also, employees should be encouraged to report any damage that results from daily work activities.

5. Electrical Wires

One hazard people might not always be aware of when working at height is the risk of electric shock. As scaffolds are built upward, they may intersect with electrical wiring.

Why electrical wires are a hazard

One of the most common injuries that result from working on a scaffold is electrocution. If workers make contact with those wires while working, it can lead to electric shock, especially if that contact damages the wire or if the scaffold is made of metal.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

Scaffolds should be built at least ten feet away from any overhanging electrical wires, and they should be insulated against electric shock. Also, all metal parts and panels should be securely locked together to ground the structure as a whole, making sure that any electric currents are directed into the base.

6. Untrained Employees

One final hazard that comes from working on a scaffold is a lack of training among employees. There are specific ways to climb, move, and work on scaffolds that minimize injury, but if workers aren’t trained properly, they will be more prone to accidents.

Why untrained employees are a hazard

Those who aren’t aware of all the hazards of working at height won’t take steps to mitigate them, leading to injuries for themselves and others. They might fail to use proper safety equipment, clean up their work areas, or move about the structure in a way that prevents accidents.

What you can do to prevent this hazard

Training is key to accident prevention. One simple way to handle scaffolding training is to have supervisors take ten minutes each day to review safety standards with your employees. In addition, enforcing those standards can help solidify your workers’ commitment to staying safe when working at height.

Comprehensive List of Scaffolding Hazards

Scaffolds present many hazards, but they can all be mitigated with proper techniques, equipment, processes, and training. 

When you build scaffolds properly, inspect them regularly, and have everyone follow proper safety protocols, you can keep accidents and injuries to a minimum.

See Our Guide To Scaffolding Safety